Homepage Featured
Border Ranges National Park, NSW
17th Jan 2010 | Posted in: Homepage Featured, Tim's Blog 3
Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW Border Ranges National Park, NSW

As the name suggests, these magnificent ranges reach up to the sate boundary between NSW and Queensland. The story of surveying the border in these ranges is a great read. The timber people came in the mid 1800’s, chasing the ceder and hoop pine, and after them the farmers – at least in the valleys. The ranges became a national park in 1982, and then 4 years later  it was listed as a World Heritage. The day my nephew and I came here was cloudy and threatening rain – not bad for new year’s day! One of the things that fascinated me, and proved difficult to photograph, was the extremely old Antarctic Beech – said to be seeded when Julius was a lad in ancient Rome. The original tree grew for a few centuries, then fell over. However by that time a sapling had sprung from the root bole, and that in turn grew into an old tree, and the cycle continued. So, the claim is that the tree – and in many cases there would be two or three fully grown trees – is as old as Jesus! We came across these trees on the Falcorostrum Loop. I would have loved to photograph the hanging moss, but the conditions were not right for me. And we didn’t see any of the orchids of which the loop was named. However, we came across this tree (a beech) which had split – but not quite. A rainforest skink was re-energizing in the brief sunlight, so we obliged. We then continued northwards and admired the abundance of ferns on the Helmholtsia Loop (named after the lily) which is on either side of  the Brindle Creek. And the different varieties of fungi! When we started home, we came across an Illawarra Flame tree – sometimes called a Kurrajong. It is not a very good photo, I’d admit, but they do grow in the area.

I will be returning when the light is better, perhaps to try out a couple of pano overlooking eastwards to Mount Warning, standing on the lip of the ancient volcano.

Related Posts
3 Comments
  1. Joel
    9:58 pm on January 17th, 2010

    Looks good. Nice one :)

  2. @wanderdownunder
    7:19 am on August 19th, 2011

    Tim. You have a great eye for nature photography and give your viewers a unique perspective especially the Canadians as I’ve tweeted a link and several of them have made similar comments to my own. Keep clicking that camera! :)

  3. Jason
    10:25 am on April 29th, 2013

    Beautiful photos. I visited the Border Ranges for the first time yesterday and can’t wait to go back and explore more. Thanks.